Welcome to MutualFunds.com. Please help us personalize your experience.

Select the one that best describes you

Your personalized experience is almost ready.

Join other Individual Investors receiving FREE personalized market updates and research. Join other Institutional Investors receiving FREE personalized market updates and research. Join other Financial Advisors receiving FREE personalized market updates and research.

Thank you!

Check your email and confirm your subscription to complete your personalized experience.

Thank you for your submission, we hope you enjoy your experience

Market Volitile Ahead

Expert Analysis and Commentary

Has Stock Market Volatility Increased? Yes and No!

Larry Swedroe Jun 22, 2016



Kenneth Washer, Randy Jorgensen and Robert Johnson, authors of a new study, The Increasing Volatility of the Stock Market?, which was published in the Summer 2016 issue of The Journal of Wealth Management, examined data for the period from 1926 through 2014 to determine whether the perception of heightened volatility was accurate. The following is a summary of their findings:

  • When returns are measured on a monthly basis, volatility (as measured by the standard deviation of returns) has not really changed since about 1940.
  • The trend line shows that monthly volatility was slightly less than 4 percent in 1940 and slightly greater than 4 percent in 2014.
  • However, when measured on a daily basis, volatility has more than doubled, with that trend beginning around 1970. Daily volatility was less than 0.5 percent in 1940. It had risen to more than 1 percent in 2014.
  • When only downside volatility was considered (investors are often primarily concerned with downside volatility), the results were the same. Daily volatility has increased, but there has been no trend in monthly volatility.

The authors concluded: “These results suggest that investors would be wise to ignore daily fluctuations in the market and take comfort in the fact that, over longer holding periods, despite all the innovations in the market [such as high-frequency trading] that have led to a proliferation of trading activity, volatility really has not changed much.”


The Bottom Line


Download Our Free Report

Why 30 trillion is invested in mutual funds book